From The New York Times’ Archive: Babe Ruth’s 500th Home Run (1929)

A slugger’s 500th home run is a much celebrated feat, often times more so than the 600th. Maybe it is the 500th home run level of difficulty: 600 has only been accomplished by eight batters; 500 by twenty-five with Albert Pujols only 25 away entering 2013.

In 1929, no hitter had reached the 500 plateau. In fact, only Babe Ruth had more than 250. When Ruth went deep on August 11, 1929 in Cleveland, many were unsure of how to react. Every one was used to Ruth, his power and the achievements that accompany. This home run was seen coming from a mile away. They did know, however, that a home run total as high as 500 needed to be celebrated.
Continue reading From The New York Times’ Archive: Babe Ruth’s 500th Home Run (1929)

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Ravens’ Suggs Marries Girlfriend Less Than Month After She Filed a Temporary Protective Order

On November 20th, Candace Williams, girlfriend of Baltimore Ravens’ All-Pro linebacker Terrell Suggs, filed a temporary protective order against the player, alleging, in an altercation in September, he punched her and dragged her alongside his car while driving at a high speed. The two also had issues over the custody of their two children. Williams eventually dropped the protective disorder.
Continue reading Ravens’ Suggs Marries Girlfriend Less Than Month After She Filed a Temporary Protective Order

From the New York Times’ Archives: Babe Ruth’s 60th Home Run of the Season (1927)

The 1927 New York Yankees is much argued as the greatest team in baseball history. The team was dubbed “Murderer’s Row” because of the lethal abilities of their line-up which included Lou Gehrig, Earle Combs, Bob Meusel, and, of course, Babe Ruth. The team won 110 games, losing only 44. A member from the 1927 Yankees lead the league in every important offensive category besides batting average (Detroit’s Harry Heilmann hit .398) and stolen bases (St. Louis’ George Sisler stole 27).

The bat and ball from Babe Ruth's 60th home run in 1927 currently sits in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
The bat and ball from Babe Ruth’s 60th home run in 1927 currently sits in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Among those categories was home runs, in which New York held the top three spots. In third, versatile, 5’11” infielder Tony Lazzeri hit 18. Second was the league’s Most Valuable Player, Lou Gehrig, who hit 47. And atop the leader board was Babe Ruth who set the all time record for home runs in a season with 60. The Yankees, as a team, hit 158 of the American League’s 439 home runs that year, accounting for just under 36% of the bombs.

On September 30th, 1927, Ruth hit his 60th home run of the season, breaking his own single-season record of 59.
Continue reading From the New York Times’ Archives: Babe Ruth’s 60th Home Run of the Season (1927)

From the New York Times’ Archives: Mel Ott’s 1st Career Home Run (1927)

OttMel Ott is often forgotten in baseball lure. Overshadowed by rivaled, cross-town Yankee slugger Babe Ruth, Ott also brought a heavy stick to the game that was still adjusting to the long ball. From 1929 to 1938, Ott swatted 323 home runs, an average of 32 per season. He finished his career with 511, 3rd all time behind only Ruth and Jimmie Foxx.

In a game against the Chicago Cubs on July 18th, 1927, Ott connected for his first career home run, a drive off of Hal Carlson in New York in the first game of a doubleheader.
Continue reading From the New York Times’ Archives: Mel Ott’s 1st Career Home Run (1927)

From the New York Times’ Archives: Babe Ruth’s 1st Home Run (1915)

Attending college affords many opportunities for which I am beyond grateful. One of these opportunities presented by Towson University is an excellent library with online research databases for all subjects.

Possibly the best research database is ProQuest Historical Newspapers which, among other current newspapers, holds an archive of the New York Times dating as early as 1851.

As a result of my fascination with baseball and, more specifically, home runs, I decided to search the database for write-ups of historic New York blasts. Simply put, I hit the jackpot. I wish I could post the full articles and pictures, but I am fairly certain ProQuest does not allow reproductions.

The articles are interesting and definitely worth a share. Beginning with the earliest historic home run, I would like to share my findings.

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Babe RuthOn May 6th, 1915, Boston Red Sox pitcher Babe Ruth hit is first career home run, a solo shot in the third inning off of New York Yankees pitcher Jack Warhop.
Continue reading From the New York Times’ Archives: Babe Ruth’s 1st Home Run (1915)

A&E’s Storage Wars: Another Staged Reality Show

Dave HesterStorage Wars, a show on A&E showing the fast-paced, risky, and often rewarding business of buying storage units, is a favorite of many during a television era defined by similar reality shows.

Today, news broke that Dave Hester, most likely the most despised cast member of Storage Wars, filed a lawsuit against the producers of the show. The suit claimed that Hester was fired for voicing his complaints of the show’s staging of events which included planting items in lockers for the cast to bid on, as well as fronting money for some members who were financially unable to make a bid.
Continue reading A&E’s Storage Wars: Another Staged Reality Show